Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  4-5 / 12 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 4-5 / 12 Next Page
Page Background

Page 4

Page 5

The Dog Pound

The Dog Pound

By Miranda Hicks

“I believe that we will win!”

LCHS fans are the best

According to the New York

Times, only about twenty

percent of Americans can hold

a conversation in a language

other than English. This

statistic is rather depressing

compared to the fifty-four

percent of Europeans who are

bilingual and the twenty-five

percent who are able to speak

three languages. In order to

combat the mono linguistic

epidemic in the United States,

schools, starting with LCHS,

should offer more foreign

language options.

Currently,

LCHS

only offers Spanish as a foreign

language. While Spanish is the

second most spoken language

in the United States, offering

other options would greatly

benefit students. The majority

of students at LCHS will take

Spanish class.

Some will enjoy

learning

about

another

culture and learning a second

language, but some will also

despise it or will struggle to

pass.

In order to help

prevent this problem, LCHS

should offer a German and

a French class. German is

considered to be more difficult

than Spanish or French,

perfect for students who like

a challenge. German, as well

as French, can be especially

beneficial for anybody who

would like to travel or even

live in Europe.

Many students feel

that learning Spanish is being

forced upon them. By giving

them options, students will be

more inclined to learn.

Although

Spanish

is very beneficial, being able

to speak German can help

students learn about their

personal backgrounds, while

French can give students an

upper hand in the competitive

job market. For those who are

lucky enough to have grown

up speaking two languages,

having the option to learn a

third language would be a

blessing.

Besides being able to

speak another language, being

bilingual has several benefits.

Speaking a separate language

boosts brain power and can

help prevent dementia and

Alzheimer’s disease in later

years.

Instead of promoting

the “In America we speak

English” movement, schools

should

work

towards

expanding students’ cultural

knowledge.

By Maddy Hunter

By Collin Nemmers

Need a good book to read this

winter? Look no further! Le

Mars Community students

have some good reads to

recommend.

If you are looking for

a romantic book, senior Haley

Jungers recommends

The

Longest Ride

.

“Any Nicholas Sparks

book is a good one,” adds

senior Makena Masuen.

Senior Leah Langdeaux

agrees, saying that

Safe Haven

is her favorite.

For

a

more

adventurous novel, Natalie

Pena recommends

Maximum

Ride

or any other of James

Patterson’s books.

Senior

Kelli

Susemihl

enjoys

reading

post-apocalyptic books. Her

favorite is

Life As We Knew It,

the first of a trilogy about life

after an asteroid hits the moon.

Cheyanne

Allen

enjoys

The Giver

, a story about

a dystopian society disguised

as a perfect world.

A popular favorite

among LCHS students is the

Harry Potter series. Senior

Sydney Brown is a self-

confessed “Potterhead.”

Skyler Toben’s all-

time favorite book is

Aristotle

and Dante Discover the

Secrets of the Universe

. She

recommends it because it’s

straightforward, but will still

“hit you in the feels.”

A

few

personal

favorites of this writer are

The Book of David, The Great

Gatsby,

and

Letting Ana Go.

The Hate List,

and

13 Reasons

Why

are my absolute favorites,

and I strongly recommend

them to anyone who enjoys

young adult novels with

symbolic meanings.

Some people do not

have a favorite book. “I don’t

read,” claims senior Collin

Nemmers. Tragic.

Quoted from a library

wall, “Reading gives us a place

to go when we have to stay

where we are.” It may be a

little cheesy, but this statement

is also very true. Curl up with a

good book this winter!

May we help you? Students working the concession stand.

Students expect snow on Christmas

Here in Iowa, snow on

Christmas is something that

most people have come to

expect. In the past, we have

had a decent accumulation of

snow by the first of December.

However, in the past couple of

years it seems as though the

amount of snow accumulated

before December is becoming

less and less.

This year, we did not

receive any amount of snow

that is really worth talking

about before December 1 and

that is both a good and bad

thing. Not having snow makes

driving much safer but without

it the landscape of Iowa is

much more boring to look at.

What would it be

like if for once, we did not

have any snow on Christmas

morning? A few students were

asked how they felt about a

Christmas with no snow.

Matilynn

Langel

says, “It literally can’t be

Christmas without snow.”

Shaylynn

Ahlers

says, “It doesn’t even feel like

Christmas to me if there is no

snow. Snow is what gets me in

the Christmas spirit.”

Parker

Magnussen

states, “It’s good so I don’t

crash my car.”

Aaron

Bagstad,

Alaina Kessenich, and Emily

Carlson say that it would not

be Christmas without snow.

Jake Thompson says,

“A Christmas without snow

would be as surprising as if I

made a jump shot.”

Katie McAllister says

she cannot even think about it

because it makes her so sad.

“AChristmas without

snow is depressing. The only

good thing that comes with

the cold is the beautiful snow.

It brings spirit,” says Jayden

Weiler.

Caleb

Kettleson

states, “I feel the same way as

I feel about Santa; there is no

such thing.”

For many people,

snow is an important part of

the holiday season. The snow

can help bring about holiday

spirit and a beautiful scenery as

to which the people in Le Mars

have grown to love. Let’s just

hope that Mother Nature does

not let us down and gives us

a nice blanket of snow before

Christmas morning.

Senior Craig Schwartz leads the proud and loud Bulldogs in the crowd-pleasing before game chant.

Too cold to go outside? Read a book!

With

Christmas

coming,

everyone’s Christmas list is

getting longer. Many presents

this year will be anything from

students who want new phones

to those who want gift cards

to their favorite restaurant or

clothing store to the basics,

money.

With

the

giving

season ahead, most love to

give amazing presents, but we

also enjoy receiving presents

from the people we love most.

Students were asked to share

their best gift ever with readers.

Jacob Corbin said,

“One time I got a steel cut

Minnesota Vikings logo.”

Micheala Thrun said, “I got a

horse.”

Sami Wood said, “ I

received Bath and Body Work

gift cards.”

Robert Murra said the

best gift he has received was

his truck.

Victor Agular enjoyed

a pair of “Nike shoes.”

Believe it or not

Sydney Landis most enjoyed a

“pie.”

“Mod-lite,”

said

Blaise Coffee.

Jorden Schlies said,

“Minnesota Vikings tickets.”

Noelle Nilles said

that she got board games.

Whether the best

present is making Christmas

cookies or being around the

Christmas tree with all the

people you love. Have a merry

holiday!

Best gifts ever

2016: The year of the memes

Students would benefit from

more foreign language courses

By Luis Barrera

Students with a smile work the concession stand

The three ornaments, Collin Nemmers, Paul Meis, and Connor

Ouradnik.

Sophomores (left) Connor Ouradnik and Karson Morehead took time

out of their busy academic schedule to build a holiday tree out of books.

By Luis Barrera

As 2016 comes to close, let’s

take a look back at how we got

here, through memes. What

exactly is a meme? According

to Google Dictionary, a meme

is an element of a culture or

system of behavior that may be

considered to be passed from

one individual to another by

no genetic means, especially

imitation.

Meme

originates

from the Greek word mimēma

which means that which is

imitated and was first coined

in 1976 by Richard Dawkins,

in his book The Selfish Gene.

A new theory suggests that

memes have been a way of

releasing stress. The most

common of these has been

the worship of Harambe, an

ordinary gorilla who was shot

after a child fell into his pen.

Harambe instantly became

a martyr and a beacon of

hope for a country that was

in shambles. Although many

millennials have only recently

been introduced to memes,

memes have been around for a

long time.

In 1990, a new field

of study was introduced.

Memetics was created in

order observe the concepts

and spread of memes. As of

2011 Northwestern University

in Illinois offers a major in

Meme Studies. Nobody knows

how this is even possible,

but Assistant Dean, Joan

Linsenmeier claims students

have been petitioning the

university for years.

In

response

to

the

students’

feedback,

Linsenmeier

responded,

“Northwestern

students,

you can has (sic) a degree in

Meme Studies.” She unveiled

some courses offered by

the Department of Internet

Memeology, which included

Introduction to Redditology

and The Sociology of Rage

Comics.

Instead of

promoting the

“In America we

speak English”

movement, schools

should work

towards

expanding

students’ cultural

knowledge.