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By Alec Rieken

Page 9

Page 8

The Dog Pound

The Dog Pound

By Andrea Kommes

By Skyler Toben

A day in the life of an assistant principal

LCHS welcomes new study

hall supervisor

Editorial: Money cannot

buy true happiness

Should underclassmen be able to attend prom?

The new semester includes is

a new staff member at LCHS.

Sue Reed, wife of Mark Reed,

is the new study hall teacher

replacing the legend LeAnn

Hobson.

Mrs. Reed’s career

before accepting the job

at LCHS was working at

Siouxland Community Health

and Mid Sioux Opportunity.

When asked about

how she heard of the job

opening Mrs. Reed responded,

“I heard about the opportunity

through my daughter, Mrs.

Buhman, the new school

nurse. So, I applied with great

excitement.”

Mrs. Reed is thrilled

with her new hours, and she

is eager to get to know the

students, staff, and LCHS

community.

Mrs. Reed loves the

community and believes it’s

a great, safe place to grow

up. No stranger to LCHS, the

study hall supervisor has three

children who graduated from

LCHS.

When asked if she

was enjoying her new career

Mrs. Reed simply relied, “The

transition to my new job was

smooth, and I definitely am

enjoying my new career as a

study hall teacher. Everything

was in place when I came, and

I plan on keeping it that way,

but also plan on putting my

own spin on things here.”

Mrs.

Reed’s

granddaughter, Aly Buhman,

is currently attending LCHS

as a sophomore. Her grandson,

Cameron, graduated last May.

“It’s kind of weird,

but I actually really enjoy

having her here. It’s nice to

give her a wave in the halls

between classes,” states Aly

Buhman.

Take a minute to

make Mrs. Reed feel welcome.

Can money buy happiness?

That is the question people

have debated for many years.

Lots of people disagree, but

some would say there are some

exceptions.

A student who would

like to remain anonymous

thinks that once basic needs are

taken

care

of,

money

will

not

make people

happier.

Senior Maddy Hunter

states, “I think money can buy

happiness, but it cannot buy

joy. There is a certain feeling

in your chest you get when

you think about someone or

something. There are not many

things you can buy in order to

feel that.”

In

my

opinion,

a person can be happy

temporarily from materialistic

things, but things do not

provide long-term happiness.

For instance, you feel really

good and happy that you got

the new iPhone 7. The next

year rolls around and a new,

better phone comes out. You

might not be so thrilled about

having the old, lousy iPhone 7

now.

Some might say that

the rich seem happier, but

people are only seeing how

they

act

when they

are in public.

M a n y

celebrities in

the spotlight all the time might

be under a lot of pressure. For

example, they could turn to

drugs, alcohol, or provocative

activities. Celebrities may be

dealing with mental illness,

family problems, etc.

People

who

have companionship and

relationships,

are

much

happier. So, the next time you

are upset about your parents

not buying you something

or not being able to afford

an item, just remember that

money is not everything.

Sorry underclassmen: Prom is

for the big kids! Prom season

is right around the corner and

the promposals have already

begun.

The age old question,

“Should

freshman

and

sophomores be able to attend

prom?” is a touchy subject for

some students. Many schools

only allow upperclassmen to

attend prom, no exceptions.

Le Mars Community is much

more lenient. Upperclassmen

can go to prom, but they can

bring an underclassmen as a

date if they wish.

Some upperclassmen

fully

support

taking

underclassmen to prom; others

don’t care. A large population

are against freshmen and

sophomores going to prom.

Seniors Megan Bergquist

and

Krista

Zenk

both

answered “no” when asked

if underclassmen should be

invited to prom. “Kick them

out,” Zenk adds jokingly.

Senior Kelli Susemihl

has a neutral opinion on

underclassmen going to prom.

“As long as they’re actually

invited and don’t just sneak

into the dance, who cares?” the

senior states.

Personally,

I

have mixed feelings about

underclassmen going to prom.

Paying for all the prom wares

for just two years is costly

enough, so imagine the price

over the years for three or

four proms. Also, as most

people know, many students

make poor choices on prom

night. A fourteen year old

being exposed to certain prom

activities could mean trouble.

Lastly, I think going to

prom as an upperclassmen is a

special and sacred experience.

For seniors, prom is the one

last hurrah before graduation,

and having a freshman at prom

can take away from the perks

of being an upperclassmen.

On the other hand,

if upperclassmen is dating an

underclassmen, they should

be able to spend prom night

with their special person.

Also, mature underclassmen

who respect and listen to

upperclassmen when making

proms plans can be granted the

benefit to attend prom.

At the end of the

day, prom is a right for

upperclassmen and a privilege

for

underclassmen.

Take

Gina Gearke’s advice: “Fair

warning, what you see can’t be

unseen.”

By Maddie Hunter

He jests at scars that never

felt a wound. But soft, what

light through yonder window

breaks? It is the east and

Juliet is the sun! That thou

her maid art far more fair

than she

Second

semester

in Freshmen English classes

means the time has come

to read and closely analyze

William Shakespeare’s

Romeo

and Juliet.

Pictured is Mrs. Jodi

Richey’s sixth hour class doing

group work with Mrs. Rosalee

Ellefson, a favorite substitute

in the high school.

Freshmen begin analyzing

Romeo and Juliet

As a high school student, many

activities are available for

students to be a part of. These

activities include activities

such as sports, speech groups,

band, orchestra, robotics, T&I,

and many more!

One may debate

whether or not to participate

in out of school activities,

but being involved in extra-

curricular activities during

high school is one of the best

decisions a student can make.

One reason to be

involved in extra-curricular

activities is that a student

will usually make new

friends or find people with a

common interest. This type of

relationship can last a lifetime

and go past high school. New

friends are always nice to have

and will make the school days

much more enjoyable!

A second reason

extra curriculars are a great

idea is potential scholarships

after high school. Scholarships

are given for athletes, band

members, and choir members

among others. Scholarships can

help with the cost of attending

college and all the money

available will help, but first

you have to be involved to get

these scholarships!

A

third reason to

be engaged in

extra-curricular

activities is for

the fun involved.

Nothing can beat

performing in front

of parents, alumni,

and

community

members.

The feeling of

knowing that the

town is there to

watch you perform

may be pressuring

to

some,

but

nothing

defeats

representing a city

that will be behind

you through good

times and bad.

Being involved in

extra-curricular activities is

one of the best decisions a

student can make. So choose a

club or activity and have fun!

Get involved!

Get involved in extra curricular activities

By Brady Kommes

Service with a smile: Mrs. Sue Reed is the new study hall supervisor

replacing long-time employee, Mrs. Le Ann Hobson.

Have you ever really wondered

what the life as an assistant

principal is like behind the

scene? Mr. Neal Utesch has

been great for LCHS.

Assistant principals

are

truly

underestimated

sometimes. Most can agree

that an assistant principal has

one of the most demanding

jobs in a school district. Mr.

Utesch puts up with things that

most teachers and staff do not.

According to Mr.

Utesch, working with students

with each day different from

the other is the best part of the

job. Daily duties are mainly

meeting the needs and well-

being of students.

Mr. Utesch became a

principal because he wants to

“impact the lives of students.”

As busy as his life may be,

he enjoys watching movies,

playing baseball, and watching

baseball in his free time.

Mr. Utesch’s family

is also a big part of his life.

He and his wife, Heidi, have

two daughters. Taylor is a

sophomore at Woodbury

Central, and Kaylee is a sixth

grader at Woodbury Central.

His wife is a counselor

at

Sergeant

Bluff-Luton

Community School. The

family also has a two-year-old

dog named Peanut.

Mr. Utesch added

that he just really enjoys his

job. LCHS is blessed to have

him as an assistant principal.

Thanks for all you do for this

school and continue to do!

Mr. Neal Utesch, high school assistant principal, spends a good part of

the day “putting out fires” and holding students accountable for their

attendance and academic success.

The Bulldogs are ready to play ball!

Can money buy

happiness?