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The Dog Pound

The Dog Pound

By Maddy Hunter

Ever get the winter blues?

This may actually be a health

issue. According to Mayo

Clinic’s website, Seasonal

Affective Disorder, commonly

referred to as SAD is “a type

of depression that’s related to

changes in seasons.”

Seasonal

Affective

Disorder is most common in

the fall and winter months. The

sun provides us with important

vitamins, like Vitamin D.

Because of the cold

weather and shortened amount

of daylight, people tend to

spend less time outside. The

decrease in sunlight absorption

can mess up the body’s

biological clock and cause

a drop in serotonin levels.

Serotonin affects mood, so low

levels can cause depression

and irritability.

Some symptoms of

SAD are anxiety, sadness,

moodiness, loss of interest,

overeating,

weight

gain,

trouble concentrating, and

sleeping more but still feeling

tired. People aged 15-55

are more at risk of Seasonal

Affective Disorder.

People can overcome

SAD through light therapy,

medication, or in extreme

cases, psychotherapy. Sitting

next to special light box that

provides the same benefits to

sunlight can help change brain

chemicals and boost serotonin,

which will help SAD sufferers’

moods.

In more serious cases

of SAD, antidepressants may

be a solution. Exercising and

going outside regularly can

also be solutions for SAD. In

addition, psychotherapy can

help people cope with stress

and understand the negative

thoughts and poor mood

associated with Seasonal

Affective Disorder. Other

therapies that help balance the

mind are yoga, meditation, and

acupuncture.

Mental health and

physical health are equally

important; take care of yourself

this winter!

Student council volunteers pack care packages for Siouxland Soldiers

Student council volunteers missed class on Friday, November 11, to box up the care packages for the annual Siouxland Soldiers fund raiser. The student council

would like to thank all the students who contributed to the success of the project. LCHS students are good people!

Football

As the winter season rapidly

approaches and a new slew of

sports begin practice, let’s take

a look back on how the fall

sports ended up.

As many probably

know, the football team has

not had good seasons the past

couple of years. In the past two

seasons, the team combined

for only four wins. However,

this year was a different story.

During this season, the team

got back on track to a winning

program by finishing the

season with six wins and three

losses.

Senior players were

asked for thoughts on this

year’s season.

Craig Schwartz says,

“I felt accomplished. We did

what we needed to do to get

the program going back in the

right direction. I was proud

to be a football player unlike

other (last) years.”

Kyle

Kliever

responds, “I really enjoyed

going to practice every day.

This has been by far my

favorite season.”

“I thought it was a

good season with the bros,”

says Colton Beitelspacher.

Tron Hamilton says,

“It was really fun to be a part

of the team. I feel like we set

the bar high, so now everyone

knows what needs to be done.

Dirt squad out.”

Congratulations

to

the football team on a much

needed winning season.

Volleyball

For many years, the

volleyball team has been quite

the contender around the area.

This year was no different.

The squad followed

up a respectable season last

year of 19-19 by winning

20 out of 35 games. In each

game, the girls went out with

the mind set of “we are going

to win” because winners have

that mind set in any sport.

The two seniors,

Krista Zenk and Sydney Rand

were asked how they feel about

their final season.

Sydney says, “I think

that it went well and that we

competed with tough teams.”

“I am proud of

everything we accomplished,

and I am happy to have been

a part of such an awesome

team and program,” says

Krista.

Congratulations

to

the volleyball team on a great

season.

Cross Country

During this cross

country season, many of the

runners for both the guys and

girls’ teams set new personal

records. Besides beating the

person next to them, all runners

strive to run their personal

best.

Three runners that

did very well this season are

freshmen Chloe Calhoun,

Kara Albrecht, and sophomore

MaddieHurt.All three qualified

for state after finishing 10th,

11th, and 12th at the district

meet. The girls team was just

one place short of making it

to state meet finishing fourth.

Each team member improved

her time during this meet;

however, which is a great

accomplishment.

Congratulations

to

Chloe finishing 52nd, Maddie

finishing 55th, and Kara

finishing 59th at the state meet

as well as the rest of the guys

and girl’s teams on a great

season.

Fall sports wrap-ups and reflections

By Collin Nemmers

Bulldog Nation gives thanks

By Brady Kommes

November includes falling

leaves and temperatures. A

special holiday in this scenic

month

is

Thanksgiving.

According to

History.com,

Thanksgiving began in 1621,

when the Plymouth colonists

and the Wampanoag Indians

shared a harvest feast.

For more than two

centuries, Thanksgiving was

celebrated

by

individual

colonies and states. This

changed in 1863 when

President Abraham Lincoln

proclaimed this great holiday

to be known as Thanksgiving

during

each

November.

Families come and gather to

share memories, to get caught

up in each other’s lives, and

to enjoy the presence of one

another. Family members

usually take turns sharing what

they are thankful for.

LCHS students share

what they are thankful for

this Thanksgiving. Walker

Raymond: I am thankful to

be alive and surrounded by

family.

Jordyn Jongerius: I

am thankful for my bed.

Sydney Brown: I am

thankful for my godson.

Cheyanne McGee: I

am thankful for my best friend

coming home.

C h a n d l e r

Grosenheider: I am thankful

for my best friend, Katelyn

Raymond.

Haley Jungers: I am

thankful for my family and

friends.

Abby Foster: I am

thankful for my dogs.

Leah Volkert: I am

thankful for my family.

Kailyn Huisman: I

am thankful for having a house

and a wonderful family who

can cook.

Logan Boylan: I am

thankful for being with my

family that I don’t get to see

on a regular basis.

Sophie Fedders: I am

thankful for my family and

friends.

Cooler weather got you blue?

Shopping season is upon us

once again. November is the

time to give thanks to all of

those around us, but is also the

start of the holiday shopping

season.

Many stores are

coming out with great deals

trying to have the lowest price

on different items so more

people will buy them. These

deals make shopping more

affordable for those who do

not have a lot of money to

spend on gifts.

The great deals also

make shopping for younger

people a lot more plausible

for teenagers looking to get

presents for friends and family.

Some teens find it

difficult to go shopping for

others because they are used

to just spending money when

they have it. However, when

the holiday season comes

those spending habits tend to

change. Instead of spending

money rapidly, some people

save a little bit here and there

so they can buy a nice present

for someone else.

A

few

people

were asked about how their

spending habits change as the

holiday season comes closer.

Senior

Preston

Chesteen says, “I try not to go

out to eat as much to help save

money.”

“I have a huge family

to buy gifts for, so I try to start

my shopping early and make

sure to get good deals,” says

senior Gabe Toki.

Seniors Krista Zenk

and Megan Friedenbach both

said that they spend money all

the time regardless of the time

of the year, so their spending

habits don’t change much as

the holidays approach.

Not everyone has the

same opinion about spending

money when shopping, so find

a way that works with your

budget. Happy shopping.

Let the holiday shopping begin

By Collin Nemmers

At 1:30 am CST on November

9, 2016, Donald J. Trump was

officially named the president-

elect of the United States.

Republican candidate Trump

won the election with 279

electoral votes; Democratic

candidate Hillary Clinton

lost the presidency with 228

votes. Although Trump won

the electoral vote, Clinton won

the popular vote; an event that

has now happened only five

times in U.S. history. Trump

earned 52 percent of Iowans’

votes, giving him the state’s

six electoral votes.

Although a LCHS

twitter poll showed that 57

out of 89 students thought that

Trump would win the election,

most polls and political

analysts did not predict a

Donald Trump victory. Many

Americans were also surprised

by the Trump win. So how did

the reality star/businessman

become the leader of the free

world?

Donald

Trump

began his campaign on June

16, 2015. He ran against 12

other Republican candidates

in the primaries, including

Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz.

Trump secured the GOP

nomination on July 19, 2016

at the Republican National

Convention.

One of Trump’s

famous campaign promises

was to “build the wall” on

the Mexican border. Donald

Trump also supports the 2nd

Amendment, is pro-life, and

wants to make veterans a

priority.

Although

Trump’s

campaign

was

full

of

controversy, his ability to “tell

it as it is” appealed to voters.

His anger about America’s

problems also resonated with

the American people.

After

Trump’s

victory, Hillary Clinton made

her concession speech in

Manhattan on Wednesday,

November 9. “We must

accept this result,” she stated.

“Donald Trump is going to be

our president… We owe him

an open mind and a chance to

lead,” said Hillary Clinton.

Barack

Obama

also spoke. “It’s no secret

the president-elect and I

have some pretty significant

differences. Nevertheless, we

are all rooting for Trump to

succeed,” Obama stated.

2016 election recap

By Kelli Susemihl

Thankfully full on Turkey Day

By Skyler Toben

When people think of

thanksgiving, many think of

spending quality time with

family, dressing up nice, and

most importantly, stuffing

their face with food. Whether

turkey, stuffing, potatoes

and gravy, cranberry sauce,

corn, various casseroles, or

yams, people are guaranteed

to feel full for the rest of the

year.

Lately, more people

seem to care about the food

eaten on this holiday than to

appreciate what Thanksgiving

is all about, being thankful.

Some students shared opinions

on the topic.

Junior Alec Rieken

states, “I think I enjoy spending

time with my family more than

the food, honestly.”

Senior Sydney Rand

agrees, “Although the food is a

bonus, I just like to spend time

with my family and realize

how lucky and thankful I am.”

Leah Langdeaux has

a different thought in mind, “I

love spending time with my

family, but I love food more.”

Maddy Hunter says

she appreciates both equally,

“My mom is a really good

cook. We have a nice dinner

with my parents and siblings,

so it’s about equal for me.”

The

stereotype

for Thanksgiving might be

true, but family time is still

important for just about

everyone. Be extra thankful

this Thanksgiving!

Students gather outside after lunch even though the cold temperatures

have arrived.