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The Dog Pound

The Dog Pound

By Miranda Hicks

By Brady Kommes

Students kick around

Kick a Ginger Day

By Maddy Hunter

Recently in Señorita Jill

Bomgaars’

Spanish

IV

class, students constructed

“Ofrendas”, or offerings.

This project was for Dia de

los Muertos, or the day of the

dead. In this project, students

constructed

creative

and

colorful projects for a relative

who is deceased, a historic

figure, a character from fiction,

or even a pop culture icon.

The project involved

a box that is no larger than

a shoe box, four items that

would have represented the

chosen person’s life, a picture

of the person, and a gift that the

person would enjoy or that the

student has always wanted to

give to them.

Dia de los Muertos

is a holiday celebrated every

year on November 1. It is

most strongly associated with

Mexico where the tradition

began, but Spanish speaking

countries such as Guatemala,

El Salvador, and Spain also

celebrate this holiday. Dia de

los Muertos celebrates the

lives of the deceased with food,

drinks, parties, and activities

the dead enjoyed in life. The

holiday also recognizes death

as a normal part of human

life, just like birth, childhood,

and growing up to become a

contributing member of the

community.

Those who celebrate

Dia de los Muertos believe

that the dead awake from

their eternal sleep to celebrate

this holiday with their loved

ones. During these parties and

festivities, popular symbols

such as “calacas” or skeletons,

and “calaveras” or skulls, often

can be seen in many locations.

Parades, masks, and candy

sweets are also popular during

this celebration.

Students involved in

the Dia de los Muertos project

learned many useful skills that

translate to real life and their

education. During this activity,

students presented the project

in front of the class with a note

card full of English and had

to translate it to Spanish with

practice and hard work.

This allowed students

to learn to become more open

speaking in front of the class

and improve comfortability

with Spanish. Both of these

factors will help a student be

more outgoing with others

who speak Spanish and also

more content speaking in front

of crowds which will occur in

the future.

The Day of the Dead has come:

Dia de los Muertos ha llegado

By Kelli Susemihl

By Alex Orban

High school choir director

Randy Ewing enjoys keeping

things fresh. This year instead

of having Chamber and

Concert Choir, he decided to

have Treble and Bass Clef

Choruses during first quarter.

“There are several

reasons why I divided the

choirs this way. First, I wanted

to promote treble and bass

clef choirs for large group

contest in the spring. Second,

I wanted to address specific

issues to the male and female

voices. Finally, I wanted to

try something new to keep it

fresh and exciting,” states Mr.

Ewing.

The change caused

different reactions among

choir members. Some miss

having the mixed choirs with

both girls and boys. Others

enjoy meeting new people and

experiencing a different sound.

Caden

Washburn

enjoyed Bass Clef Choir. “I

liked how the focus was more

on building up the strength of

people’s voices and not just

sounding good,” he explains.

Mariah Schilmoeller

thought Treble Clef Choir was

a needed break from her male

peers. “I enjoyed being with all

the ladies and not the annoying

brats, the boys,”

Madisen

Parker

explains, “I enjoyed having

a class with people I may

not have had a class with

otherwise.”

Andrea

Barrett

agrees. “I enjoy meeting new

people,” she states.

Regardless of how

other choir members felt

about the change, the choirs

will return to being split into

Concert and Chamber the

second quarter. Concert Choir

is a singing group in which all

students have an opportunity

to participate in, whereas

sophomores, juniors, and

seniors audition for Chamber

Choir.

Noah Watson, a

member of Chamber Choir, is

excited for the “potential of

this year’s [Chamber] choir.”

He also looks forward to

“seeing how the choir sounds

without the freshmen.”

Megan Connor looks

forward to “having choir with

Noah Watson again.”

Whether the split

was a positive experience or

not, look forward to the mixed

sound of the Chamber and

Concert Choirs!

November is widely known as

the month for giving thanks

and preparing for the winter

holidays, but it also holds a

less cheery holiday - “Kick a

Ginger Day.”

Kick a Ginger Day

derived from an episode on

the satirical comedy show,

South Park.

In the episode,

gingers (people with pale skin,

red hair, etc.) are the targeted

group for discrimination.

The official Kick a

Ginger Day website reads,

“The episode is an obvious

parallel to the holocaust, but

does succeed in tastefully

delivering the message about

how easily one person can

influence the opinions of

the masses and create stupid

hate and discrimination with

absolutely no reasoning behind

it.”

There are several

alleged dates for Kick a

Ginger Day, but the “official”

date for the barbaric holiday is

November 20.

Kick a Ginger Day

strikes fear into the hearts of

local redheads. Senior Gina

Gearke describes the holiday

as a “hate crime” against her

people.

Junior

Morgan

Boheme says, “I feel heavily

discriminated against because

of my race.”

Senior spokeswoman

for ginger rights, Kelli

Susemihl states, “Honestly, I

feel disrespected and violated.

Also I have a bruise from

Krista Zenk.”

Many other gingers

felt too afraid to come forward

with their opinions about Kick

a Ginger Day, fearing getting

kicked.

Non-gingers

find

Kick a Ginger Day to be

enjoyable. Known ginger-

kicker Krista Zenk is a fan

of the holiday. The senior

proclaims, “I fully support

Kick a Ginger Day, mostly

because of Kelli Susemihl.

She’s asking for it 99 percent

of the time.”

It should be noted that

Kick a Ginger Day is intended

as a joke, so please, be friendly

to the gingers of LCHS!

Former Ohio State Buckeye encourages

students to help stop bullying

LCHS middle school and high

school students listened to

Jimmie Bell, a former Ohio

State Buckeye, on November

1. The speaker’s message

to students was to help stop

bullying.

Young people all over

the world experience bullying

in some sort of way. Bullying

can happen anywhere, but most

commonly happens on school

grounds. School officials try to

stop it every time but bullying

cannot easily be defeated.

Well, Jimmie Bell is not going

to let bullying defeat him or

the people around him.

Bell is a former

defensive linemen for the Ohio

State Buckeyes. Bell weighed

in at 265 pounds and is 6’6”

tall. Bell in the Buckeyes won

the Rose Bowl in 1997. Bell

was also a two-time Big Ten

Champion. Jimmie was in the

NFL Draft and was drafted

by the New York

Giants in 1999,

but he also played

for three other

football teams and

two of the three

were in a league

in Germany. He

played for the

Frankfort Galaxy

in 2000 and then

got traded to the

Berlin Thunder

in 2000. He then

came back to the

NFL and signed

with the San

Diego Chargers in

2000.

Since retiring from

the NFL, Bell travels around

the country and telling them

his experience in bullying. He

has been to hundreds of school

and enjoys what he does. He

also works for the company

called Sports World.

Senior

Brady

Kommes says, “It’s really neat

that a former NFL player is

speaking out against bullying

because he was bullied as a

kid.

Senior Kyle Kliever

says, “I think Jimmie Bell is a

huge inspiration to many kids

in the country.”

Collin Nemmers and Kelli Susemihl demonstrate kicking a ginger.

Chamber and concert choirs begin practicing

Le Mars is starting to look like

Christmas, but wait, not in

November!

Many commercials

and stores started gearing up

and putting out Christmas

decorations before Halloween

was even over.

Students were asked

when people should start

decorating for the holidays?

Samantha Wood and

Michaela Thrun said, “After

Thanksgiving.”

Abraham

Cerda

said, “Two weeks before

Christmas.”

Shopping for gifts, on

the other hand, is a different

story. Samantha Wood said,

“Anytime is a good time.”

Abraham

Cerda

said, “Two weeks before the

Christmas.”

Michaela

Thrun

said,” You should shop all

year’ round and hide gifts, so

you get the best deals on all

year long.”

Some people start

decorating early for Christmas

is because they have a lot of

decorations to put up. They

might not have enough time to

put them all out so late.

Celebrate the holidays

as they come. Do not forget

to celebrate Thanksgiving.

Christmas will always be there.

Holiday season starts too early

Brady Kommes presented his ofrenda for John

Britton, Le Mars businessman who was instrumental

in the success of the Le Mars Little League complex.

Natalie Pena shows her ofrenda to the class during Spanish 4.

Jessica Eisma created her ofrenda honoring her

grandfather.

21st Century Foods:

Something sure smells good

Teamwork: Trey Whiddon preparing to serve the fajitas while Cali

Brown cleans up the dishes.

Senior Dennis Harvey sautes the round steak while freshman Isabel

Majeres supervises.