Newsletter Aug-Sept 2018

Newsletter Aug-Sept 2018

It is the policy of the LeMars Community School Dis- trict to provide equal opportunity in its provision of edu- cational and auxiliary programs for students. The district will not engage in any illegal discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, socioeconomic status, creed, disability or marital status in its educational programs, activities or employment policies and practic- es. The board requires all persons, agencies, vendors, con- tractors and any other persons or organizations doing business with or performing services for the district to subscribe to this policy and to all applicable federal and state laws or lawful regulations. In addition to its policy and practice of equal opportuni- ty and non-discrimination, the board directs that the dis- trict’s education program shall foster knowledge and appreciation for the historical and contemporary contri- butions of diverse cultural groups as well as those of both women and men. The curriculum will also reflect the diverse variety of occupational and societal roles open to both women and men. Questions or complaints alleging illegal discrimination on the basis of gender should be directed to the district’s Title IX and Multicultural Gender Fair Coordinator – Mr. Neal Utesch, Associate High School Principal, 921 3rd Ave. SW, LeMars, IA 51031, phone 712-546-4153. Questions or complaints alleging any other types of ille- gal discrimination should be directed to the district’s Equity Coordinator – Rachel Leavitt, Curriculum Direc- tor, 940 Lincoln Street SW, LeMars, IA 51031, phone 712-546-4155. Inquiries or complaints may also be directed to the Iowa Civil Rights Commission in Des Moines, Iowa, or to Region VII Office of Civil Rights, Education Division, Kansas City, Missouri. Students can experience learning loss when they do not engage in educational activities during the summer months. On  average , students lose the equivalent of two months of math and reading skills during the summer months. More than half of the achievement gap between lower- and higher-income youth can be ex- plained by unequal access to summer learning opportunities. Encourage reading all summer long. This will help prevent the “ sum- mer slide ” and provide benefits that can be seen  year-round .   Visit the  local library  and help your child put together a sum- mer reading list. Celebrate each time he or she finishes a book, this will encourage them to complete the list by the time the summer ends. Summer is the perfect time to let your child’s imagination run wild and stimulate creativity. Kids.gov provides resources for arts and crafts projects that will keep children engaged and their minds active while having fun. NGA Kids  – Choose from a variety of activities or projects from the National Gallery of Art, enjoy an animated musical adventure, take a tour through the sculpture garden, and more. Smithsonian  – Are your children fans of  ? Then this is the perfect activity for them. Here you are magically taken to the museums at night. To get back home, you have to solve mysteries and help your new friends find their artworks. In addition to academic risks, children can also be at an increased risk of weight gain when they are out of school during the summer months. Take advantage of the warmer weather and keep youth active out- doors. KidsHealth.org  – How do you feed a picky eater or encour- age a child to play outside? Learn how to keep your child healthy with the right foods and exercise. Let’s Move!  – Opportunities for kids to be physically active, both in and out of school and create new opportunities for families to be moving together. USDA Summer Food Program –  This U.S. Department of Agriculture program provides free meals to all children 18 years old and under in areas with significant concentrations of low-income children. For additional tips throughout the summer, follow @usedgov on Twit- ter, and check out the U.S. Department of Education Facebook page. Donohue, K. (2013). . Retrieved July 16, 2018 from https://blog.ed.gov/2013/06/seize-the-summer-keep-kids-active- engaged-in-learning/.

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